A command line tool for simple note taking.

Corey Prophitt f363c7a173 Removed debugging states, fixed RuboCop errors 4 years ago
bin 1a4107a4e6 Added new digest IDs 5 years ago
lib a9bad7152f Incremented gem version 4 years ago
screenshots 914083b598 Updated screenshot to represent new ID system 5 years ago
test f363c7a173 Removed debugging states, fixed RuboCop errors 4 years ago
.gitignore 6504189885 Converted from Yaml to JSON for tasks list 5 years ago
.travis.yml f6ca7bafa4 Added make lint task and added linter 5 years ago
Gemfile f6ca7bafa4 Added make lint task and added linter 5 years ago
Gemfile.lock f6ca7bafa4 Added make lint task and added linter 5 years ago
LICENSE 0c849e60a3 Added license file. 5 years ago
Makefile 58275dc6df Added clean task to Makefile 5 years ago
README.md 7610d6b7f3 Replaced underscore with **word** notation 5 years ago
Rakefile ff08db0c3e Added Rakfile with basic setup for tests 5 years ago
t.rb.gemspec a9bad7152f Incremented gem version 4 years ago

README.md

t.rb Build Status Gem Version

A Terminal Task Manager

alt text

After using Steve Losh's t application for a week I have found it to be very useful. I found the simplicity and versatility of ’t’ to be very appealing. The notion of a task application for people that want to finish tasks resonated with me.

The only complaint I have with ’t’ is the ID system. It appears the IDs are hashes and not predictable. The order of the tasks become unintuitive and require reading tasks to find the one you completed and then finding the ID so you can mark it finished. In order to be even more productive I thought it would be great if the task list was ordered in a simple incremental fashion.

t.rb uses a similar approach to IDs. Each ID is derived from a digest of the task text but the order is incremental (each new task appears below the previously added task).

Installation

Installing the gem from RubyGems is the most simple way to install:

gem install t.rb

Alternatively, you can clone this repository and install the gem yourself.

  1. make init
  2. make build
  3. make install

Regardless of how you install you can use t as described below.

Usage

Get a full list of commands via the help menu

t -h

Adding a task to your list

t some-task-description (create)

Listing all unfinished tasks

t

Finishing a task on your list

t -f ID

Editing a task on your list

t -e ID some-new-description

Configuration

Note, when you add tasks to your list, t will create a file in the current folder to store the tasks. The file is named .tasks.json. If you don't want this file in your source control you should append it to your ignore list.

For instance, if you're using Git:

echo ".tasks.json" >> .gitignore

License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2015, Corey Prophitt <prophitt.corey@gmail.com>

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
THE SOFTWARE.